NBBC Gospel Partners

“I thank my God in all my remembrance of you, always in every prayer of mine for you all making my prayer with joy, because of your partnership in the gospel from the first day until now” (Philippians 1:3-5)

Our aim is to support “gospel partners” across a variety of missions, both close to home and overseas.

Taking the relationship between the Apostle Paul and the Philippian church as our example, we hope our gospel partnerships too are characterised by intimacy.  They knew each other and cared for each other (Philippians 1:8).  It was a partnership with people, not an organisation.

We hope that like them our partnerships also are informed.  We can see in Philippians 4:4 and 4:16 that Paul and the Philippians knew each other’s needs.  We aim to have good communication with our gospel partners so we can support each other well, and so our praying is informed and effective.

Thirdly, we want these partnerships to be involved (as we see in Philippians 1:5).  We aim for long term, consistent relationships with both giving and receiving (Philippians 4:16) at it’s heart.

These partnerships should involved purses (Philippians 4;16), people (they sent personnel as we see in Chapter 2), and prayer (Philippians 1:3-4 and 1:19).

With these things in mind we currently support the following gospel partners at NBBC:

Daniel Caballero working with UFM / GBM in Peru.

Valathi Outreach Church Ministries

Gwen Kearley and her work in local schools

Chris Morgan with his local outreach ministry

Catherine Haddow with her counselling and women’s ministry

 

 

 

 

Village Fete Survey

Last Saturday we were out on the village green again, this time not for the Jubilee, but the fete. We set up our tent in the wind, and set out our stall of edible Olympics medals for the kids to make, some real Guinness Book of World Records to try and set – coin spinning, basketball twirling, and cream cracker eating, and we did a survey.

Despite the weather, we had 40-50 kids making medals, plenty of budding record breakers, and thirty taking the survey.

The survey rode on the back of the one we did two weeks ago, where nearly fifty responded. In it we asked about quality of life – was it better to live in the 50’s, now, or in say 60 years from now? It was amazing, and quite concerning to see how the overwhelming majority of local people, of all ages, thought the past was better than now, unless you were retiring, and that the future offered little hope. The reasons people gave were breakdown of community, loss of innocence, advent of television, and financial concerns about the future. Continue reading “Village Fete Survey”